Tuesday, January 12, 2010

internet porn acceptablER THAN PIRATE MOVIES


Porn 'more acceptable' than pirated videos: survey
11:50 AM Tuesday Jan 12, 2010

Three times as many New Zealanders think it is morally acceptable for a single person to view pornography on the internet than to download copyrighted video, according to a new poll.

The survey also indicates gender differences in what is morally acceptable behaviour, with women being overall less approving of viewing pornography, using dating services, downloading copyrighted material and flirting with others on the internet.

The results are the second in a series of UMR polls on morality. One thousand New Zealanders were surveyed online in November.


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The poll indicated 41 per cent of New Zealanders think it is morally acceptable for a single person to view pornography, compared with 13 per cent who see downloading copyrighted video as acceptable and 18 per cent who consider downloading copyrighted music acceptable.

Twenty one per cent thought it was morally acceptable for a married person to view pornography online without the knowledge of the person's spouse.

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Although 69 per cent thought it was acceptable for a single person to flirt with another internet user, just 6 per cent thought it was morally acceptable for a married person to flirt with another internet user without their spouse's knowledge.

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The survey showed up substantial gender differences. Fifty-six per cent of men thought that it was acceptable for a single person to view pornography online, compared with 26 per cent of women.

Similarly, 31 per cent of men were comfortable with married people viewing pornography online without the knowledge of their spouses, compared with just 10 per cent of women.

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The survey also showed that seeing music and video downloads as morally unacceptable did not necessarily prevent people from making such downloads, with substantial proportions of those who have downloaded music or video from unofficial sites nonetheless saying that such activity is morally unacceptable.

The margin of error for the survey was plus or minus 3 per cent.

- NZPA

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Wellington, Jan 12 (ANI): A new survey has shown that a lot of New Zealanders think it’s more acceptable to download porn than to illegally download copyrighted material.


According to the UMR Research survey, 41 percent of Kiwis think that it is morally acceptable for a single person to view pornography, compared with 13 percent who see illegally downloading copyrighted video as acceptable and 18 percent who consider illegally downloading copyrighted music acceptable.

Twenty one per cent think it is morally acceptable for a married person to view pornography online without the knowledge of the person’s spouse, reports Stuff.co.nz.

Although 69 percent think that it is acceptable for a single person to flirt with another Internet user, just 6 percent think it is morally acceptable for a married person to flirt with another Internet user without their spouses’ knowledge.

The survey showed up substantial gender differences. More than 50 percent of men think that it is acceptable for a single person to view pornography online, compared with 26 percent of women.

Likewise, 31 percent of men are comfortable with a married people viewing pornography online without the knowledge of their spouse, compared with just 10 percent of women. (ANI)


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Washington, Dec 2 (ANI): A University of Montreal researcher refutes demonization of pornography, insisting it is overly criticized and doesn’t change men’s perception of women and their relationships.

During the study, Simon Louis Lajeunesse, a postdoctoral student and professor at the School of Social Work recruited and interviewed 20 heterosexual male university students who consume pornography.

“The objective of my work is to observe the impact of pornography on the sexuality of men, and how it shapes their perception of men and women,” said Lajeunesse.

“They shared their sexual history starting with their first contact with pornography, which was in early adolescence. Not one subject had a pathological sexuality. In fact, all of their sexual practices were quite conventional,” he added.

Lajeunesse found that 90 percent of pornography is consumed on the Internet, while 10 percent comes from video stores.

On average, single men watch pornography three times a week for 40 minutes. Those who are in committed relationships watch it on average 1.7 times a week for 20 minutes.

Most boys seek out pornographic material by the age of 10, when they are most sexually curious.

However, they quickly discard what they don’t like and find offensive. As adults, they will continue to look for content in tune with their image of sexuality. They also rarely consume pornography as a couple and always choose what they watch.

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The test subjects said they felt victimized by rhetoric demonizing pornography.

“Pornography hasn’t changed their perception of women or their relationship which they all want as harmonious and fulfilling as possible,” said Lajeunesse.

“Those who could not live out their fantasy in real life with their partner simply set aside the fantasy. The fantasy is broken in the real world and men don’t want their partner to look like a porn star,” he added.

Lajeunesse refuted the perverse effect often attributed to pornography.

“Aggressors don’t need pornography to be violent and addicts can be addicted to drugs, alcohol, gaming and asocial cases are pathological. If pornography had the impact that many claim it has, you would just have to show heterosexual films to a homosexual to change his sexual orientation,” he added. (ANI)



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